Introduction to Philosophy

Philosophy 001 – Introduction to Philosophy: Naturalism and the Human Being
University of Pennsylvania
Fall 2011

Class Meetings: Tuesday and Thursday 9-10:30am; 493 Claudia Cohen Hall

Instructor: Reed Winegar
Instructor Email: winegar@sas.upenn.edu (please allow up to 24 hours for a response)
Office Hours: 401 Claudia Cohen Hall, Tuesday 3-5pm or by appointment; extra hours will be held prior to paper due dates

Course Description: This course aims to introduce students to major themes and methods in philosophy by examining the writings of both historically important philosophers and more contemporary thinkers. The course focuses primarily on philosophical treatments of the human being with special emphasis on the characters of the human mind and the human will. Taking the human mind and the human will as starting points, this course examines issues in both theoretical philosophy and value theory. Throughout the course, we will be particularly concerned with our ability to integrate a scientific perspective of the human being with various features of human existence. Finally, the course will introduce students to various conceptions of philosophical method in the attempt to clarify how we might best attempt to understand our own existence as human beings in the natural world.

Course Readings: The following Course Readings are available for purchase at the Penn Book Center (130 S. 34th Street). All other Course Readings are available on the course’s Blackboard page.

•Hume, David. Enquiries concerning Human Understanding and concerning the Principles of Morals, third edition. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975.
•Kant, Immanuel. Practical Philosophy, translated and edited by Mary J. Gregor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
•Kant, Immanuel. Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics with Selections from the Critique of Pure Reason, revised edition, edited by Gary Hatfield. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
•Watson, Gary (ed.). Free Will, second edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

General Course Expectations: Students are expected to attend all classes and to be prompt. Students should complete all readings prior to class, since we will discuss the readings together in class. In cases of absence due to illness, the instructor reserves the right to request a doctor’s note to confirm that the student was ill. Comments and questions in class are highly encouraged; we are all interested in hearing everyone else’s ideas! All students must abide by the University of Pennsylvania’s code of academic integrity (for full details see http://www.upenn.edu/academicintegrity/).

Assignments and Grading: There will be three required written assignments.

First Paper – 25% of final course grade
Second Paper – 35% of final course grade
Take-Home Final Exam – 40% of final course grade

All written assignments will be “blind graded.” Late papers will lose one third of a letter grade for each class meeting that the paper is late (e.g. a paper due on Tuesday but turned in on Thursday will lose one third of a letter of a grade). If a paper is late due to serious illness, then the instructor reserves the right to request a doctor’s note to confirm that the student was ill. Class participation can raise or lower one’s final grade by up to one third of a letter grade (e.g. B+ raised to A- for excellent class participation).

Further Details regarding assignments and grading:
•The instructor will not discuss any graded assignment during the first 24 hours after the paper is returned. After 24 hours have passed, the instructor will be more than happy to meet to discuss any graded assignment.
•If you believe that an assignment deserved a different grade than that provided by the instructor, then you may submit a two-page, typed, double-spaced paper explaining why a different grade was merited. This explanation must explicitly respond to the initial feedback and comments provided by the instructor. Such explanations must be submitted within 72 hours after receiving the graded paper. There is no guarantee that the instructor will alter any grade.
•Any request for an extension must be made prior to the paper due date (except in rare cases, e.g. a true medical emergency).

Course Schedule

INTRODUCTION

Thursday 9/8 – Images of the Human Being: Human Mind and Human Will

UNIT I: THE HUMAN MIND

Tuesday 9/13 – Hume on Impressions and Ideas
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 5-24 (Enquiry concerning Human Understanding Sections 1-3)

Thursday 9/15 – Hume on Passion and the Idea of Causation
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 25-55 (Enquiry concerning Human
Understanding Sections 4-5)

Tuesday 9/20 – Hume on Passion and the Idea of Causation Continued
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 56-79 (Enquiry concerning Human
Understanding Sections 6-7)

Thursday 9/22 – Hume on Passion and Skepticism
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 149-65 (Enquiry concerning Human
Understanding Section 12)

Tuesday 9/27 – Kant’s Theory of Human Cognition
Reading: Kant Prolegomena pp. 5-31 (Preface and §§3-5) and Selections from the Critique of Pure Reason in Kant Prolegomena pp. 139-55 (B Preface and B Introduction)

Thursday 9/29 – Kant on Human Sensibility
Reading: Kant Prolegomena pp. 32-45 (§§6-13) and Selections from
the Critique of Pure Reason in Kant Prolegomena pp. 156-60) (B Transcendental Aesthetic)

Tuesday 10/4 – Kant on Human Understanding
Reading: Kant Prolegomena pp. 46-58 (§§14-24) and Selections from the Critique of Pure Reason in Kant’s Prolegomena pp.161-77 (A and B Transcendental Analytic)

Thursday 10/6 – Kant on Human Understanding Continued
Reading: Kant Prolegomena pp. 58-78 (§§25-39) Selections
from the Critique of Pure Reason in Kant Prolegomena pp. 177-81 and
pp. 184-86 (A and B Transcendental Analytic)
Assignments: First Paper Assignment distributed in class

Tuesday 10/11 – NO CLASS due to Fall Break

Thursday 10/13 – Kant on the Metaphysics of the Soul Reading: Kant Prolegomena pp. 79-89 (§§40-49) and Critique of Pure Reason pp. A348-A396 (A Paralogisms) [Available on Blackboard]

Tuesday 10/18 – The Manifest and Scientific Images of the Human Mind
Reading: Selections from Sellars “Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man” [Available on Blackboard]

Thursday 10/20 – Images of the Human Mind
Reading: Block “The Mind as the Software of the Brain” [Available on Blackboard] and Lewis “Mad Pain and Martian Pain” [Available on Blackboard]
Assignments: First Paper Assignment due at beginning of class

Tuesday 10/25 – Images of the Human Mind Continued
Reading: Dennett “True Believers” [Available on Blackboard]

Thursday 10/27 – Consciousness and Images of the Mind
Reading: Nagel “What is it like to be a Bat?” [Available on Blackboard]

Tuesday 11/1 – Consciousness and Images of the Mind Continued
Reading: Chalmers “Facing up to the Problem of Consciousness” [Available on Blackboard]

UNIT II: THE HUMAN WILL

Thursday 11/3 – Hume on Freedom
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 80-108 (Enquiry concerning Human Understanding Sections 8-9)

Tuesday 11/8 – Hume on Moral Motivation
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 170-5 and pp. 268-94 (Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals Section 1, Section 9 and Appendix I)

Thursday 11/10 – Hume on Moral Motivation and Moral Disagreement
Reading: Hume Enquiries pp. 324-43 (A Dialogue)

Tuesday 11/15 – Kant’s Antinomy of Freedom
Reading: Kant Prolegomena pp. 79-85 and pp. 90-99 (§§40-45
and §§50-54) and Kant Critique of Pure Reason pp. 484-89 (Third Antinomy) [Available on Blackboard]

Thursday 11/17 – Kant on Autonomy and Freedom
Reading: Kant Practical Philosophy pp. 61-93 (Groundwork Section II: Transition from Popular Moral Philosophy to Metaphysics of Morals)

Tuesday 11/22 – Kant and the Practical Point of View
Reading: Kant Practical Philosophy pp. 162-80 and pp. 211-25 (Selections from the Critique of Practical Reason)
Assignments: Second Paper Assignment distributed in class

Thursday 11/24 – NO Class due to Thanksgiving Break

Tuesday11/29 – The Theoretical and Practical Points of View
Reading: Bok “Freedom and Practical Reason” pp. 130-66 in Watson Free Will

Thursday 12/1 – The Theoretical and Practical Points of View Continued
Reading: Strawson “The Impossibility of Moral Responsibility” pp. 212- 28 in Watson Free Will and Nagel “Freedom” pp. 229-56 in Watson Free Will

Tuesday 12/6 – Desires and Reasons
Reading: Frankfurt “Freedom of the Will and the Concept of a Person”
pp. 322-36 in Watson Free Will and Watson “Free Agency” pp. 337-51 in Watson Free Will
Assignments: Second Paper Assignment due at beginning of class

Thursday 12/8 – Desires and Reasons Continued
Reading: Wolf “Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility” pp. 372-87 in Watson Free Will and Wallace “Addiction as a Defect of the Will” pp. 324-53 in Watson Free Will
Assignments: Take-Home Final Exam distributed in class

Wednesday 12/21 – Assignments: Take-Home Final Exam due in my departmental
mailbox in 433 Claudia Cohen Hall by 11am

Note: The instructor reserves the right to alter the syllabus to accommodate class needs.